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Coronavirus Resources for Employment Social Enterprises

(last updated 6/4/20)

You can find resources here that may be valuable to Social Enterprises during the Coronavirus outbreak. REDF will be updating this site regularly as we gather information from the field.

REDF RECOMMENDS

  • REDF strongly recommends that ESEs apply to the Small Business Association (SBA) Paycheck Protection Program (PPP). The Small Business Administration will resume accepting PPP loan applications on Monday, April 27 at 10:30 AM EDT from approved lenders on behalf of any eligible borrower. This will ensure that SBA has properly coded the system to account for changes made by the legislation. This program provides small businesses with fewer than 500 employees, including nonprofits, with funds to pay up to 8 weeks of payroll costs including benefits. Funds are provided in the form of loans that will be fully forgiven when used for payroll costs, interest on mortgages, rent, and utilities. If you have relationships with lenders, REDF encourages you to start the conversation about PPP with them now. (updated 4/28/20)
  • Small Business Administration Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL)These loans may be used to pay fixed debts, payroll, accounts payable and other bills that can’t be paid because of the disaster’s impact. SBA will begin accepting new Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) and EIDL Advance applications on a limited basis only to provide relief to U.S. agricultural businesses. At this time, only agricultural business applications will be accepted due to limitations in funding availability and the unprecedented submission of applications already received. Applicants who have already submitted their applications will continue to be processed on a first-come, first-served basis. (updated 5/21/20)
  • Employee Retention Tax Credit – The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act created a new Employee Retention Tax credit to encourage companies to continue paying their employees if the business has been closed, or there has been a significant decline in sales due to COVID-19. Employers cannot receive both the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loan and the Employee Retention Tax . If a business is not approved for the PPP loan, the Employee Retention Credit could be an alternative source of government assistance.
    • ELIGIBILITY: The tax credit is available to any ESE that conducted business in 2020 and has either:
      • Experienced more than 50% decline in sales revenue (called “gross receipts”) as compared to the same quarter in 2019.
      • Reduced operations fully or partially as a result of orders from a government authority due to COVID-19, or
      • See link for more info and availability. (added 4/20/20)

NATIONAL & AGGREGATE LISTS

  • REDF strongly recommends that ESEs apply to the Small Business Association (SBA) Paycheck Protection Program (PPP).The Small Business Administration will resume accepting PPP loan applications on Monday, April 27 at 10:30 AM EDT from approved lenders on behalf of any eligible borrower. This will ensure that SBA has properly coded the system to account for changes made by the legislation. This program provides small businesses with fewer than 500 employees, including nonprofits, with funds to pay up to 8 weeks of payroll costs including benefits. Funds are provided in the form of loans that will be fully forgiven when used for payroll costs, interest on mortgages, rent, and utilities. If you have relationships with lenders, REDF encourages you to start the conversation about PPP with them now. (updated 4/28/20)
  • Small Business Administration Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL)These loans may be used to pay fixed debts, payroll, accounts payable and other bills that can’t be paid because of the disaster’s impact. SBA will begin accepting new Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) and EIDL Advance applications on a limited basis only to provide relief to U.S. agricultural businesses. At this time, only agricultural business applications will be accepted due to limitations in funding availability and the unprecedented submission of applications already received. Applicants who have already submitted their applications will continue to be processed on a first-come, first-served basis.(updated 5/21/20)
  • US Chamber of Commerce Foundation Save Small Business Fund – $5,000 Grants for small businesses that employ 3-20 people and are located in economically vulnerable community and impacted by covid-19. See website for eligibilty and application. Opens 4/20.
  • ICA Rapid Response Liquidity Fund: List of national and California-specific resources available for small businesses. Specifically to: Help assess the immediate liquidity needs of the business, Help access emergency relief funds from the SBA and other programs, Stretch the capital our small businesses currently have, and Start to rethink business strategies to respond to our new normal. (added 3/27/20)
  • Open Road Alliance: For non profits and social enterprises – We are accepting COVID-19 related funding inquiries/applications for both grants and loans. However, please note that we will be applying a specific, exceptional set of criteria to these applications. We will finalize and publish our COVID-19-specific criteria by Wednesday, March 18th. (added 3/27/20)
  • FacebookFacebook is offering $100M in cash grants and ad credits for up to 30,000 eligible small businesses in over 30 countries where it operates. Funding for For-Profit Businesses only in specific geographies listed on the website (~34 US Cities). (added 3/30/20)
  • Candid.Org –  A list of funds specifically established in the wake of coronavirus. The list focuses on funds hosted at US-based foundations that serve nonprofits, though others outside of this criteria may appear as well. (added 4/10/20)
  • Council on Foundations100+ aggregated funding opportunities. This is a list of global response funds and funding opportunities related to COVID-19 relief. (added 4/14/20)
  • Case @ DukeThis comprehensive, searchable database includes grants, loans, and other cash equivalents that can help entrepreneurs, nonprofits, and businesses anywhere in the world. 4/14/20
  • Community Foundation InitiativeThis resource lists the nearly 190 U.S. community foundations in 49 states, plus the District of Columbia, that have created relief funds to support those affected by COVID-19 — directing critical relief to local nonprofits and partnering with local governments and health organizations to help contain its spread. (added 4/14/20)
  • Albertson’s Companies Foundation – Nourishing Neighbors, a program of Albertsons Companies Foundation (a funder of the Congressional Hunger Center), has established a fund to help local families impacted by the current crisis. Funds will be used to support organizations in their effort to provide meals to school children, seniors, and others financially impacted or isolated individuals during this time. Applications can be made for up to $10,000 and are accepted and reviewed on a weekly basis.Be sure to select “COVID-19 Fund” and indicate that you were referred by the ‘Congressional Hunger Center’.See link for eligibility. (added 4/27/20)
  • LISC + Verizon – Update: A Second wave of applications are expected to open mid-April. An investment of $2.5 million from Verizon is making it possible for LISC to begin offering critical relief and resiliency-building support to small businesses facing immediate financial threat because of the COVID-19 pandemic. The funding will go to make grants of up to $10,000, especially to entrepreneurs of color, women-owned businesses and other enterprises in historically under-served places who don’t have access to flexible, affordable capital. (added 4/27/20)
  • Hello Alice: Hello Alice is offering $10,000 grants being distributed immediately to small business owners impacted by coronavirus, as part of our broader mission to ensure Business for All. In addition to funding, grant recipients will receive ongoing support from the Hello Alice community. (added 4/27/20)

CALIFORNIA

  • Aggregate List: Philanthropy CA –  Vetted the list of response funds below to help you direct resources to the most vulnerable communities. This list is updated daily. (added 4/10/20)
  • Bay Area Grant: Stupski Foundation –  These initial, general-support investments will bolster urgent and critical efforts to create food assistance, COVID-19 testing centers, child care, and other necessary supports. (added 3/27/20)
  • Bay Area Grant: San Francisco Foundation – Capacity building grants ($3,000 – $25,000) to nonprofit organizations in San Francisco, Alameda, San Mateo, Contra Costa, and Marin Counties addressing the following four issue areas, described in greater detail below: worker support, preventing homelessness and providing renter protection/housing security, ensuring food security, and addressing racial bias. (added 3/27/20)
  • Bay Area Grant: United Way Bay Area COVID-19 Community Relief Fund – Brings together UWBA’s broad community network, knowledge of organized labor, our corporate partners, local government agencies, schools, and other community-based organizations.
  • San Francisco Loan: Small Businesses Resiliency Fund– must: Have at least 1 employee and no more than 5 employees, Demonstrate a loss of revenue of 25% or more, Have less than $2,500,000 in gross receipts, Be engaged in activities that are regulated by the City and County of San Francisco, and have a license/permit associated to that regulation.
  • Los Angeles Loan: City Small Business Emergency Microloan ProgramPrimary business operation must be located within City of Los Angeles boundaries. Microloan Use of Funds must be for reasonable and eligible working capital expenses. Microloan Requirement job retention. Loan Limits $5,000 to $20,000. Eligible Uses: Working Capital Only. (added 3/27/20)
  • Los Angeles Loan: EWDD LA City – Small Business Loan Program for commercial business locations in the City of Los Angeles (http://zimas.lacity.org/). Annual revenue must not exceed $10 million and have no more than 500 employees. Must create one permanent full-time equivalent job for every $35,000 in financial assistance received from the City. Loan Limits: $50,000 to $500,000. Term/Amortization: 3-10 Years. Interest Rate: 5.5%, fixed for 12 months then adjusts to 2.5% +10yr US t-note rate. (added 3/27/20)
  • San Diego Grant: San Diego Foundation – Grant funding will focus on three critical areas: food security, rental and utility assistance, and income replacement or gap funding. A new category of assistance has also been added: no-interest loans for nonprofit organizations to provide business and community service continuity. (added 3/27/20)
  • Chicago Loan Chicago Small Business Resiliency Fund: As a direct response to COVID-19, The City of Chicago is establishing a $100 million fund which will help to provide small businesses AND non-profits with emergency cash flow during this immediate health crisis. Funds will be provided to eligible businesses as low-interest loans. The Resiliency Fund is structured to complement the new federal Paycheck Protection Program that the Small Business Administration (SBA). Apply here. (added 4/14/20)
  • Illinois Loan – Illinois Small Business Emergency Loan Fund: $60 million fund will support low-interest loans of up to $50,000 for small businesses in every industry. (added 4/14/20)

NEW YORK

  • New York City Loan: NYC Gov –  New York City government will offer businesses with few than 100 employees small grants and interest-free loans of $75K. (added 3/27/20).
  • New York City Loan: Renaissance Economic Development Corporation – Loans for restaurants, retail stores, service businesses. Initial 6 months of P&I deferment and a total term of 48 months. Businesses must demonstrate at least a 25% decrease in sales due to COVID‐19. (added 3/30/20)
  • New York City Grant: NYC COVID-19 Response & Impact Fund – The NYC COVID-19 Response & Impact Fund is a $75 million (and growing) effort to aid nonprofit service providers struggling with the health and economic effects of the coronavirus. To be eligible for the loan, you are 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, based in New York City, have annual non-governmental revenue of $20 million or less, receive New York City or New York State government funding, and have a track record of delivering effective programs and services equitably for New York City residents. These loans are geared toward nonprofits with an annual revenue of at least $750,000. (added 3/30/20)

WASHINGTON

  • Seattle Grant: Amazon: Amazon announced that small businesses located in Seattle’s South Lake Union and Regrade neighborhoods can apply for a grant from Amazon. Amazon will prioritize grants for businesses that rely on foot traffic to attract customers and that can provide information showing how much revenue they expect to lose this month. Amazon says it will disperse the grants in April. (added 3/27/20)

CASH CONTROLS

To some extent, almost all businesses may be exercising cash controls in the coming weeks. We recommend starting the process sooner rather than later.

  • Call lenders and request a grace period for making any debt payments
  • Call creditors and ask for line extensions
  • Call suppliers and service providers to request a longer payment period for bills due
  • If possible, consider reducing hours of operation with little revenue generation
  • See if your enterprise is available for emergency small business funding. The SBA and many state and city small business development centers have opened emergency loan funds to support businesses experiencing significant losses. Check your local SBDC for the latest fund availability, as legislation is being passed each day.
  • Consider running a short-term campaign to support employee wages, or asking donors who have pledged for this year to send their payments in now. Sara Gibson, founder of 20 degrees, lists out several other creative ways nonprofits can build resilience amidst the coronavirus pandemic.

OTHER RESOURCES ON CASH CONTROLS

  • Nonprofit Finance Fund – This is part 1 in an ongoing series of advice for nonprofits during COVID-19. (added 4/14/20)
  • Spectrum Nonprofit Services – From Sustainability to Survivability,
    How Nonprofits Can Manage Uncertainty Amid Crisis. (added 4/14/20)
  • Umbrex.comUmbrex has established a Pandemic Playbook as well as a Task Force of volunteer consultants which is providing pro bono coaching to owners of small businesses and directors of non-profits affected by COVID-19. (added 4/14/20)
  • California Department of Insurance – The Department of Insurance is responding to COVID-19 with a series of steps to protect public health and maintain a strong insurance market to serve consumers. (added 4/24/20)
  • Westaway Law (Kyle Westaway) – The Entrepreneur’s COVID-19 Playbook: Kyle Westaway is a prominent startup thought leader, attorney, and social impact investor. He and his team assembled a free guide to stimulus money, tax breaks, and legal tips to help enterprises survive and thrive during the pandemic. (added 4/27/20)

COMMUNICATIONS

  • Whole Whale Digital Agency – A guide for Non-Profits to implement work from home policies, including a list of discounted/free technology products. (added 3/27/20)
  • Zoom Blog – Best Practices for Hosting a Digital Event (added 4/14/20)
  • Craft Ventures – Happy Talk vs. Hard Talk: There’s a lesson in here for founders. We are not called to lead national emergencies, but we do face frequent existential challenges for our companies, with life-or-death consequences for the business. A recurring problem — probably the #1 killer of startups — is Happy Talk, a basic failure to admit problems until it is too late. (added 4/27/20)
  • National Council of Nonprofits – Technology tools for remote work and events: (added 4/27/20)
  • Nonprofit Pro – Effective Marketing Communication Strategies for Nonprofits: Strategies nonprofits can implement to set them up for success both now and after the pandemic subsides. (added 4/27/20)

OPERATIONS & HUMAN RESOURCES

From Others:

  • Pacific Community Ventures – How to set up a paid leave program for your employees. (added 3/27/20)
  • Cooley LLP – Applicability of Force Majeure and Related Doctrines in Response to COVID-19: Applicability of Force Majeure and Related Doctrines in Response to COVID-19. While every contract will be different, and the law can vary significantly between jurisdictions, this user’s guide outlines the basic steps and analytic process businesses can use to approach their particular problem. (added 4/24/20)
  • Cooley LLP: Insurance Checklist for COVID Losses: When it comes to maximizing returns from a company’s insurance portfolio, every business should be thinking about these critical steps. (added 4/24/20)
  • COVID19 Business Center, powered by Hello Alice – Updated daily, with real-world funding, resources, and support for small business owners adapting to the impacts of coronavirus. Topic range from accessing federal stimulus funding, to establishing and online presence, to anxiety and mental health support for staff. (added 4/27/20)
  • Rescue Time – Work from home productivity data: Why you (and your manager) shouldn’t be afraid of remote work: The data shows us that people who work from home are more productive and less likely to spend all day on email and chat. But that’s only the case if they have the tools and systems they need to be efficient with their time. (added 4/27/20)

LEADERSHIP

From REDF:

From Others:

  • Coro Northern California Tips for Anyone Trying to Lead During Pandemics. (added 3/27/20)
  • DeloitteFive fundamental qualities of resilient leadership distinguish successful CEOs as they guide their organisations through the COVID-19 crisis. (added 4/14/20)
  • Sea ChangeExecutive Directors and Boards will need to take decisive and difficult action if the nonprofits they lead are to survive the COVID-19 crisis. This briefing note summarizes the advice and best practices SeaChange is seeing in the field. (added 4/14/20)
  • Harvard Business Review – Anxiety is Contagious, here’s how to contain it. (added 4/24/20)
  • KonTerra GroupMental Health/Wellness Resources for leaders, managers, and employees: During this global pandemic, we are offering free webinars led by KonTerra expert consultants to help guide you in navigating the stressors and feelings that accompany the public health crisis we are facing together. (added 4/24/20)
  • Steve Blank – The Virus Survival Strategy for Startups: With the Covid-19 virus a worldwide pandemic, if you’re leading any startup or small business, you have to be asking yourself, “What’s Plan B? And what’s in my lifeboat?” Here are a few thoughts about operating in uncertainty in a pandemic. (added 4/24/20)
  • Tom Tunguz – Six Disciplines for Challenging Times: In speaking with dozens of startups, Tom collected a list of disciplines that are going to become very important this year and beyond. (added 4/24/20)
  • Stanford Social Innovation Review – Rethinking Social Change in the Face of Coronavirus: In this series, SSIR will present insight from social change leaders around the globe to help organizations face the systemic, operational, and strategic challenges that will test the limits of their capabilities. (added 4/27/20)
  • Medito – Free Non-Profit Meditation App (added 6/4/20)

PARTICIPANT RESOURCES

From REDF:

  • Federal Stimulus Payments – You are probably eligible* for a $1,200 stimulus payment. If you claimed a child under age 17 on your tax return, you may be eligible for an additional $500 per child. (added 4/22/20)
  • What to Do When… You’ve Lost Your Job or Your Hours Have Been Cut – Expanded unemployment insurance will likely replace most or all of your earnings temporarily and a federal stimulus payment is probably on its way. However, it might take a month or more for funds to arrive. This is what you need to do to get through these tough times. (added 4/22/20)

From Others:

  • Root and ReboundRoot & Rebound’s Bay Area, Northern California, Los Angeles and South Carolina services will be offered remotely (through phone, video and mail) for re-entry or incarcerated related issues. (added 3/27/20)
  • CA EDD: Employers planning a closure or major layoffs as a result of the coronavirus can get help through the Rapid Response program. Rapid Response teams will meet with you to discuss your needs, help avert potential layoffs, and provide immediate on-site services to assist workers facing job losses. (added 3/27/20)
  • LA Jobs Portal: For Angelenos whose jobs have been impacted by COVID-19, this website enables unemployed or underemployed Angelenos to find and apply for emergency resources and job opportunities across all industries, so they can start working right now. (added 3/30/20)
  • One Fair Wage – Service Workers Support Fund: One F0air Wage is providing cash assistance to restaurant workers, car service drivers, delivery workers, personal service workers and more whose incomes were significantly and abruptly impacted by the COVID-19 outbreak. (added 3/30/20)
  • Homebase This list, updated regularly, summarizes federal, state and private company responses to offset the economic impact of the COVID-19 outbreak for hourly and shift workers. (added 4/14/20)
  • Freelancers Relief FundFreelancers Relief Fund will offer financial assistance of up to $1,000 per freelance household to cover lost income and essential expenses not covered by government relief programs, including: Food/food supplies, Utility payments, and Cash assistance to cover income loss. (added 4/14/20)
  • GrantspaceGrantspace by Candid has aggregated a comprehensive list of 211.org and private funds that have been set up to support individuals and families impacted by the COVID-19 outbreak. (added 4/14/20)
  • IRS.govTo help millions of people, the Treasury Department and the Internal Revenue Service launched a new web tool allowing quick registration for Economic Impact Payments for those who don’t normally file a tax return. The non-filer tool provides a free and easy option designed for people who don’t have a return filing obligation, including those with too little income to file. The feature is available only on IRS.gov, and users should look for Non-filers. (added 4/14/20)

FROM REDF:

REDF is hosting a Q + A conversation for ESEs on Shoptalk Here

 

FROM OTHERS:

Cara Plus – To continue to help other practitioners, Cara Plus will be sharing out different practices and step-by-step guides on how they’re navigating COVID-19, as well as practices they adopted in the last recession to help get people back to work via otheir new page on LinkedIn. They kicked this off last week with a guide on how they developed our $90k Emergency Fund.

(Updated 5/21/20)

RELIEF PACKAGES

Congress has so far passed four coronavirus response packages. The fifth relief bill is being discussed right now. Below you’ll find highlights of what’s been included in the four passed bills as it is relevant to your employment social enterprise, in addition to what is being discussed right now. This analysis does not include all the provisions that came out of the packages.

COVID-19 Relief Supplemental Package #4Paycheck Protection Program and Health Care Enhancement Act, (H.R.266)

Latest Action: Signed into law on Friday, April 24.

Highlights:

  • Paycheck Protection Program (PPP)
    • $310 billion to the Paycheck Protection Program, the SBA’s short-term forgivable loan program for small businesses and nonprofits with less than 500 employees.
    • Of the $310 billion total:
      • $30 billion for loans made by Insured Depository Institutions and Credit Unions that have assets between $10 billion and $50 billion; and
      • $30 billion for loans made by Community Financial Institutions (including CDFIs and Minority Depository Institutions), Small Insured Depository Institutions, and Credit Unions with assets less than $10 billion.
  • Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL)
    • $50 billion for EIDL loans, administered directly by the Small Business Administration.
    • $10 billion for Emergency EIDL Grants of up to $10,000 each.

 

COVID-19 Relief Package #3Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act (H.R.748)

Latest Action: Signed into law on Friday, March 27.

Highlights:

  • Includes $2 trillion in emergency funding – largest fiscal bill in US history.
  • Emergency Small Business & Nonprofit Loans ($377 billion): This consists of the following:
    • $350 billion in loan forgiveness grants (Paycheck Protection Program, PPP) to small businesses and nonprofits to maintain existing workforce and help pay for other expenses like rent, mortgage, and utilities.
    • $10 billion for SBA Economic Injury Disaster Loans (EIDL) which eliminates creditworthiness requirements and appropriates an additional $10 billion to the EIDL program so that eligible nonprofits and other applicants can get checks for $10,000 within three days to provide immediate relief for small businesses and nonprofits operating costs.
    • $17 billion for SBA to cover 6 months of payments for small businesses with existing SBA loans.
  • Industry, State, Local, Tribal, and large nonprofits bailout loans: $504 billion fund for industries, with transparency measures and restrictions on use of funds. Of the funds above, $454 billion supports lending facilities that would be leveraged to provide up to $4.5 trillion in lending for distressed businesses as well as states, municipalities, tribes and large nonprofits that have between 500 and 10,000 employees.
  • Economic Development Administration: $1.5 billion to support economic development grants for states and communities suffering economic injury as a result of the coronavirus.
  • Community Development Block Grant (CDBG): $5 billion. CDBG is a flexible program that provides communities and states with funding to provide a wide range of resources to address COVID-19, such as services for senior citizens, the homeless, and public health services. Funding will be distributed using formula.
  • Dislocated Worker National Reserve: $345 million for states and communities to respond to the workforce impacts and layoffs resulting from the coronavirus.
  • Charitable Giving Incentive: Includes a new above-the-line deduction (universal or non-itemizer deduction that applies to all taxpayers) for total charitable contributions of up to $300. The incentive applies to contributions made in 2020 and would be claimed on tax forms next year. The bill also lifts the existing cap on annual contributions for those who itemize, raising it from 60 percent of adjusted gross income to 100 percent. For corporations, the bill raises the annual limit from 10 percent to 25 percent. Food donations from corporations would be available to 25 percent, up from the current 15 percent cap.
  • Employee Retention Payroll Tax Credit: Creates a refundable payroll tax credit of up to $5,000 for each employee on the payroll when certain conditions are met. The entity had to be an ongoing concern at the beginning of 2020 and had seen a drop in revenue of at least 50 percent in the first quarter compared to the first quarter of 2019. The availability of the credit would continue each quarter until the organization’s revenue exceeds 80 percent of the same quarter in 2019. For tax-exempt organizations, the entity’s whole operations must be taken into account when determining the decline in revenues. Notably, employers receiving emergency SBA 7(a) (Paycheck Protection Program) loans would not be eligible for these credits.
  • Direct Payments to adults of $1,200 or less and $500 per child ($3,400 for a family of four) to be sent out in weeks. The amount of the payments phases out based on earnings of between $75,000 and $99,000 ($150,000 / $198,000 for couples).
  • Expanded Unemployment Insurance: Includes coverage for workers who are furloughed, gig workers, and freelancers. Increases payments by $600 per week for four months on top of what state unemployment programs pay.
  • Amendments to the New Paid Leave Mandates: Lowers the amounts that employers must pay for paid sick and family leave under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act to the amounts covered by the refundable payroll tax credit – i.e., $511 per day for employee sick leave or $200 per day for family leave.
  • State and local government Funding – $139B. The bill stipulates that within 30 days of enactment the Treasury secretary shall distribute funds to state and local governments. Amounts going to each of the 50 states will be determined in proportion to the population, with no state government receiving less than $1.25 billion. Eligible local governments are defined as any governing body below the state level having more than 500,000 people under its purview. The inspector general of the Treasury is charged with conducting oversight of receipt and distribution.

 

COVID-19 Relief Package #2Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) (H.R.6201)

Latest Action: Signed into law on Wednesday, March 18.

Highlights:

  • Expands emergency paid sick leave and family medical leave.
  • Provides emergency unemployment stabilization (including grants to States for activities related to disbursing unemployment benefits).

 

COVID-19 Relief Package #1Coronavirus Preparedness and Response Supplemental Appropriations Act (H.R.6074)

Latest Action: Signed into law on Friday, March 6.

Highlight:

The bill includes provisions for the implementation of SBA Economic Injury Disaster Loans (EIDL) for both small businesses and nonprofits. Loans are available at up to $2 million at 2.75% interest for nonprofits.

LAYOFF AVERSION

  • Employee Retention Tax Credit

The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act created a new Employee Retention Tax credit to encourage companies to continue paying their employees if the business has been closed, or there has been a significant decline in sales due to COVID-19.

Employers cannot receive both the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loan and the Employee Retention Tax . If a business is not approved for the PPP loan, the Employee Retention Credit could be an alternative source of government assistance.

ELIGIBILITY: The tax credit is available to any ESE that conducted business in 2020 and has either:

    • Reduced operations fully or partially as a result of orders from a government authority due to COVID-19, or
    • Experienced more than 50% decline in sales revenue (called “gross receipts”) as compared to the same quarter in 2019.

NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES: ESEs with more than 100 full-time employees may only claim the credit for wages paid to employees who are not working due to COVID-19 (i.e. furloughed employees). ESEs with fewer than 100 full-time employees are eligible to receive the tax credit even if all or some of their employees are working in any capacity.

TAX CREDIT: ESEs may receive a refundable payroll tax credit of up to $5,000 per employee for wages and health benefits paid after March 12, 2020 and before the end of the year.

CLAIMING THE TAX CREDIT:  There is not an application to receive this tax credit. ESEs will report their total qualified wages and the related credits for each quarter on their federal employment tax returns.

To learn more about the credit, visit this IRS webpage.

 

  • Work Share Programs

Work sharing (also known as “short-term compensation”) is a type of an unemployment benefit that prevents layoffs by allowing employers to reduce employee work hours while ​unemployment compensation makes up a portion of the difference in income. In 2012, the federal government issued guidance to states on how to use unemployment insurance benefits for work sharing programs. Rules and regulations vary by state. To date, 25 states and District of Columbia currently run work share programs.

HOW IT WORKS: Through work-share programs, employers reduce the number of hours employees works, and employees can have a portion of their lost wages made up through unemployment compensation payments. Affected employees qualify for a percentage of unemployment benefits that are equal to the percentage by which their hours have been reduced. For example, an employee whose hours are cut by 10 percent would qualify for 10 percent of the state’s established weekly unemployment benefit amount.

ELIGIBILITY: ESEs should confirm if their state has a work sharing program (see table below). If so, the employer should contact the state labor agency to apply. States differ on the eligibility requirements for employees. In some states, only permanent staff can receive this benefit, which means transitional or temporary employees would not be eligible. More information about specific state requirements can be found below.

REDF recommends that states that have not yet authorized work sharing should immediately do so. To learn more about REDF is doing to advocate for ESEs during this time, click here.

Arizona https://des.az.gov/services/employment/unemployment-employer/shared-work-program-faqs
Arkansas https://www.dws.arkansas.gov/employers/shared-work-program/
California https://www.edd.ca.gov/Unemployment/Work_Sharing_Program.htm
Colorado https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/cdle/layoffassistance
Connecticut http://www.ctdol.state.ct.us/progsupt/bussrvce/shared_work/index.htm
D.C. https://does.dc.gov/page/dc-shared-work-plan-application
Florida http://www.floridajobs.org/office-directory/division-of-workforce-services/reemployment-assistance-programs/short-time-compensation-program-for-employers
Illinois Law enacted but no program in place.
Iowa https://www.iowaworkforcedevelopment.gov/voluntary-shared-work-program
Kansas https://www.dol.ks.gov/employers/shared-work-program
Louisiana Law enacted but no program in place.
Maine https://www.maine.gov/unemployment/workshare/
Maryland http://dllr.maryland.gov/employment/worksharing/
Massachusetts https://www.mass.gov/topics/workshare-program
Michigan https://www.michigan.gov/leo/0,5863,7-336-78421_97241_89981_90231_90233-352546–,00.html
Minnesota http://www.uimn.org/employers/alternative-layoff/index.jsp
Missouri https://labor.mo.gov/shared-work
Nebraska https://dol.nebraska.gov/STC
New Hampshire https://www.nhes.nh.gov/nhworking/stay/forms.htm
New Jersey https://careerconnections.nj.gov/careerconnections/resources/sharedwork/shared_work_program.shtml
New York https://www.labor.ny.gov/ui/dande/sharedwork1.shtm
Ohio http://jfs.ohio.gov/ouio/SharedWorkOhio/
Oklahoma Law enacted but no program in place.
Oregon https://www.oregon.gov/employ/Businesses/WorkShare/Pages/Work%20Share%20Home%20Page.aspx
Pennsylvania https://www.uc.pa.gov/employers-uc-services-uc-tax/shared-work/Pages/default.aspx
Rhode Island http://www.dlt.ri.gov/ui/ws.htm
Texas https://twc.texas.gov/businesses/shared-work
Vermont https://uipublic.labor.vermont.gov/STC/EmployerFunctions/login.aspx
Virginia Law enacted but no program in place.
Washington https://esd.wa.gov/SharedWork
Wisconsin https://dwd.wisconsin.gov/uitax/workshare.htm

OTHER FEDERAL DOLLARS

Community Development Block Grants

The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act allocated $5 billion in supplemental Community Development Block Grants (CDBG) funding to prevent, prepare for, or respond to COVID-19. Additionally, the CARES Act provides CDBG grantees flexibility so that it is easier to use the grants for COVID-19 response.

  • FUNDING: Of the $5 billion, $2 billion will be supplemental funding for states and local governments that received an allocation in FY2020. Another $1 billion will be allocated to states and localities based on public health needs, the risk of transmission, the number of COVID-19 cases, and economic and housing market disruptions. Finally, the remaining $2 billion will be distributed to states and local government on a rolling basis, at the discretion of the Secretary, according to factors to be defined by the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD).
  • INCREASED FLEXIBILITY: The CARES Act provides broad authority to the HUD Secretary to waive or set alternative requirements for any statute or regulation if necessary, to expedite the use of these funds to prevent and respond to COVID-19. Additionally, the CARES Act eliminates the cap on the amount of funds a grantee can spend on public services, removes the requirement to hold in-person public hearings in order to comply with national and local social gathering requirements, and allows grantees to be reimbursed for COVID-19 response activities regardless of the date the costs were incurred.
  • NEXT STEPS: If your ESE is already a CDBG grantee and would like to receive additional funding to help prevent, prepare for, or respond to COVID-19, then please contact either your city or state depending on how you receive your funding. Additionally, a guide to CDBG eligible activities to support COVID-19 can be found here.
  • If your ESE does not already receive CDBG funding, then please contact your city or state about the application process. You can also reach out to one of HUD’s Community Planning, and Development’s Regional Offices.

Dislocated Worker Grants

The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act allocated $345 million in Dislocated Worker Grants (DWGs) to help states and cities respond to workforce impacts and layoffs resulting from COVID-19. DWGs are discretionary grants awarded by the Secretary of Labor that provide temporary employment and training programs through state and local workforce programs. DWGs are issued in response to large, unexpected economic events which cause significant job losses, such as COVID-19. DWGs also provide resources to states and local workforce investment boards to quickly reemploy laid-off workers by offering training to increase occupational skills.

  • HOW IT WORKS: In order to receive DWG funding, states must apply to the Department of Labor. A list of the states who have been approved to provide this funding can be found here. If a state has been approved, then individuals who are permanently or temporarily laid off should contact their local workforce development office to inquire about DWG opportunities.

Economic Adjustment Assistance Program Grants

The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act allocated $1.5 billion for the Department of Commerce’s Economic Development Administration (EDA) to administer grants through its established Economic Adjustment Assistance (EAA) program to help revitalize local communities after the pandemic. Grant money may be used for development of public facilities, public services, business development (including funding of a revolving loan fund), planning, technical assistance, training, and any other assistance to alleviate long-term economic deterioration and sudden and severe economic dislocation and further economic adjustment objectives. Eligible applicants include: states, political subdivisions thereof (cities, counties, etc.), district organization, Indian tribes, institution of higher education, or a non-profit acting in coordination with a political subdivision of a state. These eligible applicants must demonstrate an unemployment rate over 1% greater than the national average or other certain unemployment or economic adjustment problems.

  • NEXT STEPS: A notice of funding opportunities and information on how to apply will be posted on the Economic Development Administration’s website, which you can find here. We recommend reaching out to your individual state or local government and nearest EDA Regional Office to determine how you can access funds. To find a list of previous grant recipients in your area or the nearest EDA Regional Office, please see here.

Upcoming Webinars:

  • Ongoing Tuesdays & Thursdays – San Francisco OEWD – If you are a business impacted by COVID19 and considering work stoppages, layoffs, or furloughs, the Office of Economic and Workforce Development (OEWD) is offering virtual info sessions on Tuesdays and Thursdays for you and your employees. Together with Employment Development Department (EDD) and other partners, we will present information on unemployment benefits, healthcare resources, and career services to assist you and your employees during this critical time. 
  • June 18: Exygy – Crisis Discriminates: How Can We Protect Vulnerable Communities? This pandemic has exposed and heightened structural inequities particularly in vulnerable populations – people of color, immigrants, rural communities, people living with disabilities. Our virtual discussion will explore how each of us can be advocates for vulnerable community members

Past Webinars:

  • Miller Center for Social Entrepreneurship: This page contains links to resources and webinar recordings on business resilience and disaster recovery. (recording available).
  • Nonprofit Finance Fund – Managing through Uncertainty: As the nation grapples with the COVID-19 crisis, nonprofit leaders face tough decisions about how to sustain their organizations in a time of uncertainty. To help ensure nonprofit leaders have every tool at their disposal, we’re presenting the following free webinars on managing through this crisis.
  • Center for Nonprofit Management – Help for the Helpers – This free webinar series will help your nonprofit organization explore a host of new financing options including disaster loans, payroll protection, and bridge loans to help determine which is right for you. Geared towards nonprofit organizations, this webinar series is also open to their funders and stakeholders. (recording available).
  • Salesforce – Stories of Resilience with Mark Cuban – Today’s uncertain landscape leaves businesses looking for tools, advice, and inspiration — particularly small and midsize ones. Here’s an opportunity to get advice from Mark Cuban, live in conversation with Salesforce SVP of SMB Marketing, Marie Rosecrans. Speakers will offer strategies for adapting and pivoting during periods of uncertainty, and provide inspiration to forge a path forward. (recording available).
  • Aspen Institute COVID-19 and Unemployment Insurance – Rebecca Dixon, Executive Director of the National Employment Law Project and the newest member of the Economic Opportunities Program’s Advisory Council, to talk about unemployment insurance—how it works, who it helps, and how it might better meet the needs of the people who find themselves in need in our current crisis. (recording available).
  • James Beard Foundation: Food Industry responses to COVID-19. (recording available).
  • The Justice Collaborative: Emergency Call: COVID-19 and the Criminal Legal System. (recording available).
  • Workforce 180 – Crisis Case Management : Crisis Case Management: Dr. Beverly Ford shared best practices for serving clients during the COVID-19 crisis. (recording available).
  • Workforce 180 – Effective Crisis Leadership: Ed Trumbull, ICF Vice President as he shares ideas and ways to navigate through staff, client and community challenges facing all workforce leaders being looked upon for solutions. (recording available).
  • Workforce 180 – Crisis Employer Outreach: Effective ways to engage employers during the daily confusion of closings, layoffs and radical changes to the way people are working. (recording available).

Past Webinars: